Newbie questions and a few guidelines?

Other talk about Salix
silentwind
Posts: 24
Joined: 2. Jun 2015, 11:23

Newbie questions and a few guidelines?

Post by silentwind » 2. Jun 2015, 11:36

Hello.

I am a newcomer to Linux, coming from Windows, desktop PC user. I already have a few months' experience with Ubuntu and Mint. I can handle some basic terminal commands, but I prefer the GUI whenever possible. :)

I'm not an IT specialist, far from it. Just a normal average computer user who can read a few things if they are understandable enough, and wants a decent operating system. So please speak to me in simple human terms, I can handle high tech jargon only so much. :) Thanks.

Wanting to try new distros and enlarge my knowledge of Linux, I've decided to try Salix 14.1 Xfce 64 bit in Virtual Box live. I've also read the Startup Guide. Mostly I'm very impressed with the distro's looks and choice of apps. Still, I have a few questions:

1. Can I safely install Firefox beside Midori in Salix Xfce? Wouldn't they conflict somehow? How would I do that from Gslapt? I mean how would I know which packages are needed from all those listed?

2. I looked in Gslapt for programs I need, like ClamAV, Wine and Playonlinux, but didn't find them. How would I install those, or any other app I might not find in Gslapt for that matter?

3. How should I install video card drivers? I could do it in Mint with Driver Manager, but in Salix?! I have an Nvidia Geforce GT 240.

4. How often is Salix updated and how stable (free of bugs and app hangs) and secure is it, compared to more recent distros, like Ubuntu for example? Can I update anytime without fear of an update breaking the system?

5. I didn't see an option for Suspend/Sleep in the Shutdown menu. I often use Suspend between work sessions for saving power on the PC. Is this option available somewhere?

6. In the end, do you think I would be better with Salix in terms of stability and security (I'm willing to make some effort in configuring a few things, but nothing too complicated, since I don't want to break anything), or should I better stick with a more newbie distro, like Mint?

Thank you.

User avatar
icaroperseo
Donor
Posts: 67
Joined: 19. Nov 2014, 01:12
Contact:

Re: Newbie questions and a few guidelines?

Post by icaroperseo » 2. Jun 2015, 13:40

Hi and welcome!
slientwind wrote: 1. Can I safely install Firefox beside Midori in Salix Xfce? Wouldn't they conflict somehow? How would I do that from Gslapt? I mean how would I know which packages are needed from all those listed?
Sure, you can without any problem. Salix OS has dependency resolver for the apps, that is, you only need to tell the package manager (Gslapt/Sourcery) which application you want to install and it will take care of the rest.
slientwind wrote: 2. I looked in Gslapt for programs I need, like ClamAV, Wine and Playonlinux, but didn't find them. How would I install those, or any other app I might not find in Gslapt for that matter?
You can find them through Sourcery: http://guide.salixos.org/312Sourcery.html#4_1_2

Note: if you want to install and/or use Wine/PlayOnLinux, install Salix OS 32 bits instead (You must choose i686 and NOT i486). You can not run it in a pure 64-bit system (at least not without multilib but is an advanced topic).
slientwind wrote: 3. How should I install video card drivers? I could do it in Mint with Driver Manager, but in Salix?! I have an Nvidia Geforce GT 240.
Similarly as in the previous point.
slientwind wrote: 4. How often is Salix updated and how stable (free of bugs and app hangs) and secure is it, compared to more recent distros, like Ubuntu for example? Can I update anytime without fear of an update breaking the system?
Very rare, that is, the applications are only updated when a major vulnerability is solved and NOT to use only the new features that the new versions of applications might offer. When a new version of an application is launched, probably has undiscovered bugs/security holes, which may be insignificant to critical and can completely affect your system, this is the reason why Salix OS is not intended to provide the latest versions of applications. In short, the updates are available only when strictly necessary.
slientwind wrote: 5. I didn't see an option for Suspend/Sleep in the Shutdown menu. I often use Suspend between work sessions for saving power on the PC. Is this option available somewhere?
I have Suspend/Sleep and Hibernate enabled in my system and it works like a charm!
slientwind wrote: 6. In the end, do you think I would be better with Salix in terms of stability and security (I'm willing to make some effort in configuring a few things, but nothing too complicated, since I don't want to break anything), or should I better stick with a more newbie distro, like Mint?
From what you said, I'm almost convinced that Salix OS is for you, the biggest drawback that you might find it is that Salix is unintuitive (or rather, automated) compared with Mint/Ubuntu. This does not have to be bad,
because Salix OS always lets you do what you want and not what others think you want or need.

I hope the above will be useful, if not so, or if you have something else to ask, do not be afraid and just do it!

Best regards.
Image

Image

User avatar
ElderDryas
Posts: 144
Joined: 3. Nov 2011, 22:06
Location: Lincoln, Nebraska USA

Re: Newbie questions and a few guidelines?

Post by ElderDryas » 2. Jun 2015, 14:16

slientwind wrote:3. How should I install video card drivers? I could do it in Mint with Driver Manager, but in Salix?! I have an Nvidia Geforce GT 240.
I'd start with the link below...any questions after that, post them here.

http://docs.salixos.org/wiki/How_to_Ins ... DIA_driver

It looks harder than it really is, so don't panic (yet) :)

User avatar
icaroperseo
Donor
Posts: 67
Joined: 19. Nov 2014, 01:12
Contact:

Re: Newbie questions and a few guidelines?

Post by icaroperseo » 2. Jun 2015, 14:40

By the way:
slientwind wrote:I looked in Gslapt for programs I need, like ClamAV...
What do you need it? Do you have a mail server or something similar? If it is for a workstation then Clamav is unnecessary. Clamav normally is used in mail servers to scan emails which will be delivered to Windows workstations and not to scan the whole system as it is done in Windows (conceptually, the antivirus operate differently between GNU/Linux and Windows).

Please, do not try to apply the same Windows-like (bad) practices on GNU/Linux systems (such as: antivirus,
system cleaners —Ccleaner on Windows, Bleachbit on Linux—, defrag, etc. All you get is mess up your system, again, both operating systems are conceptually very very different). They are unnecessary.

It is preferable to ask before running a bad Windows-like practice! ;)

Regards.
Image

Image

User avatar
ChuangTzu
Donor
Posts: 335
Joined: 19. May 2015, 23:34

Re: Newbie questions and a few guidelines?

Post by ChuangTzu » 2. Jun 2015, 21:47

[quote="slientwind"
1. Can I safely install Firefox beside Midori in Salix Xfce? Wouldn't they conflict somehow? How would I do that from Gslapt? I mean how would I know which packages are needed from all those listed?
You can install as many browsers as you wish. Midori is nice, but still in early development and does crash at times. Unless you are adverse to Google you could use Chromium which is the open-source version of Chrome, there are also some nice text based browsers, and some others that are fun to play with...
2. I looked in Gslapt for programs I need, like ClamAV, Wine and Playonlinux, but didn't find them. How would I install those, or any other app I might not find in Gslapt for that matter?
I agree with the other post...unless you are running a mail server ClamAV is not really necessary...There are very very few Linux viruses, ClamAV mainly searches for Windows viruses so you do not pass them on to your windows friends via emails etc...if you send attachments.

Wine is ok for some things...buggy on many...you may want to install Windows into a Virtualbox or other virtual machine and run your windows games or software through that....you could also dual boot with Windows, however, I prefer to confine Windows to a virtualbox similar to keeping it in "jail". Only time I load windows is in a virtualbox for tax software once per year or to play a windows only game once in a blue moon.
3. How should I install video card drivers? I could do it in Mint with Driver Manager, but in Salix?! I have an Nvidia Geforce GT 240.
Link provided from other post is good.
4. How often is Salix updated and how stable (free of bugs and app hangs) and secure is it, compared to more recent distros, like Ubuntu for example? Can I update anytime without fear of an update breaking the system?
Salix is based on Slackware which is the oldest actively maintained distro. It is the closest to "pure" GNU/Linux and the closest to BSD/Unix philosophy, with the added benefits of being Linux based. Updates work like a charm and are much safer than other distros...I have used most of the major ones and some fringe distros....Slackware is solid and so is Salix...
5. I didn't see an option for Suspend/Sleep in the Shutdown menu. I often use Suspend between work sessions for saving power on the PC. Is this option available somewhere?
open a root terminal and type: pm-suspend
(command is just telling the power manager to suspend/sleep)
works like a charm. You can also adjust a config. to allow this but I find it easier to open a terminal and type it. You could search for a way to add it if you want.
6. In the end, do you think I would be better with Salix in terms of stability and security (I'm willing to make some effort in configuring a few things, but nothing too complicated, since I don't want to break anything), or should I better stick with a more newbie distro, like Mint?
It is up to you. It is important to understand the philosophy and purpose behind each distro and their parent distro if there is one. In general any of the major GNU/Linux distros are much much safer and more secure than Windows and even Apple (this is debatable regarding Apple anyway). :)

Main problem I have with Mint (for what its worth) is they are based on Ubuntu which is created by Canonical and Canonical wants to be a Linux version of Microsoft, their programers even write the code on Windows boxes. Canonical has been caught several times trying to place spyware/adware into Unity and they do not contribute much back to the community. They are based on Debian which applies way too many patches and modifications to the original software making it almost proprietary code for Debian, ie .deb files.

Slackware is vanilla everything, the way the developers intended it, is how you get it, for the most part.... So the Linux kernel is how it is shipped from the Linux Foundation, not the Debian Kernel, or the Gentoo kernel etc....

Hope that helps...and welcome to GNU/Linux....you should feel good that you are on a journey that many of us have been on and started with as well.!!!

Thank you.[/quote]

silentwind
Posts: 24
Joined: 2. Jun 2015, 11:23

Re: Newbie questions and a few guidelines?

Post by silentwind » 3. Jun 2015, 08:10

Thank you for answering to me. I'm glad I've found such a nice and helpful community. That is a very rare thing nowadays and one of the reasons I haven't started with Linux earlier...

I have other questions as well. And please forgive me if I sometimes seem to ask too many. I prefer to use a safe step by step approach when modifying system stuff, because if I'm not careful or understand what I'm doing i might do more harm than good.

Ok, my questions for now:

1.
Note: if you want to install and/or use Wine/PlayOnLinux, install Salix OS 32 bits instead (You must choose i686 and NOT i486). You can not run it in a pure 64-bit system (at least not without multilib but is an advanced topic).


The 32 bit version? But isn't that going to limit my system RAM and would I be unable to install some modern and better 64 bit apps?

My system specs are:

CPU: AMD Athlon 64 x2 5000+
RAM: 4 Gb
Video: Nvidia Geforce GT 240

From what I've read from guides and articles, they recommend the 64 bit for those CPUs capable of it, because it is supposed to go beyond 2-3 Gb RAM limitations, improve overall performance and the 64 bit apps are better.

2.
Very rare, that is, the applications are only updated when a major vulnerability is solved and NOT to use only the new features that the new versions of applications might offer. When a new version of an application is launched, probably has undiscovered bugs/security holes, which may be insignificant to critical and can completely affect your system, this is the reason why Salix OS is not intended to provide the latest versions of applications
This again puzzles me. From what I've read and heard, there are two "camps": a) one that says older software is very stable and secure as long as it includes periodical critical updates, similar to what you've said, an approach also used by Debian; b) one that says that on the contrary, newer versions fix older problems while also providing improved overall features of the program; approach taken, for example, by Fedora.

Could you please give me a good argument why camp a) is better, also in light of online protection against malware?

And, speaking of Debian, how is Salix different? Would going with Debian provide a potential user the same system stability, security and bug-free use just like Salix? Would it be simply a matter of choice? And if Salix is better, why is that?

In any case, so far I prefer Salix for the reason that the documentation is simple to understand and your community is very friendly. I've recently tried Debian's forums when I needed help and they treated me like someone who wants to waste their time. I otherwise like Debian's approach to simplicity (I, too, don't find Ubuntu appealing for the tons of modification they add) and stability, but if you can't get timely good help when you need it, well...

3.
ClamAV mainly searches for Windows viruses so you do not pass them on to your windows friends via emails etc...if you send attachments.
Well, I thought some extra caution wouldn't hurt. I have a desktop, not a server, but I have the habit to scan downloaded pictures, videos, games etc. Plus, I have friends with Windows and we exchange documents from time to time via USB drives etc.

I know that ClamAV doesn't scan in real time, and I'm okay with that. I just though some more safety measures couldn't hurt. :D

4.
Please, do not try to apply the same Windows-like (bad) practices on GNU/Linux systems (such as: antivirus,
system cleaners —Ccleaner on Windows, Bleachbit on Linux—, defrag, etc. All you get is mess up your system, again, both operating systems are conceptually very very different). They are unnecessary.
Ok, I haven't used them very often in Windows anyway, but still, how would I clean my Linux system from time to time?

5.
Wine is ok for some things...buggy on many...you may want to install Windows into a Virtualbox or other virtual machine and run your windows games or software through that....you could also dual boot with Windows, however, I prefer to confine Windows to a virtualbox similar to keeping it in "jail". Only time I load windows is in a virtualbox for tax software once per year or to play a windows only game once in a blue moon
I have a quite good experience with Wine so far in Mint. Haven't installed too much Windows software in it, though. :)

I am very interested in using Windows in Virtual Box in the future, but for now I don't think my system would handle playing 3D games like Mass Effect or SWTOR in Virtual Box!

I don't have much experience with Virtual Box, but using it for such graphically intensive games wouldn't mean playing them on minimum video settings? And even in that case, wouldn't it be quite laggy, because of the emulation? I have the impression that it would be a much worse playing experience than in the real system, but I may be wrong, of course..

6.
It is important to understand the philosophy and purpose behind each distro and their parent distro if there is one
Yes, I'm trying that. But there are so many distros, each promising to be the one with the right approach, it's so confusing. Am I right thinking that parent distros are better in general, since they keep things simpler and that means less probability of instability and bugs?

............................................

These are my questions for now. After figuring out the important 32 bit vs 64 bit riddle, I'll try to install Salix in Virtual Box and keep you updated with my progress.

Best wishes!

User avatar
gapan
Salix Wizard
Posts: 5509
Joined: 6. Jun 2009, 17:40

Re: Newbie questions and a few guidelines?

Post by gapan » 3. Jun 2015, 09:59

slientwind wrote:The 32 bit version? But isn't that going to limit my system RAM and would I be unable to install some modern and better 64 bit apps?
No. Not unless you have more than 16GB of RAM. You're thinking about Windows. This is not Windows.
slientwind wrote:From what I've read from guides and articles, they recommend the 64 bit for those CPUs capable of it, because it is supposed to go beyond 2-3 Gb RAM limitations, improve overall performance and the 64 bit apps are better.
Which "64 bit apps" are you talking about exactly? Do you have anything specific in mind?

The only difference is that in 32bit a single app cannot consume more than 4GB of RAM, while in 64bits it can. Unless you're running a web server with php and thousands of (concurrent) visitors or something like trying to compute pi to an almost infinite number of decimals (and doing it all in RAM), you'll never reach that.

There is no such thing as "64 bit apps are faster than 32 bit apps because 64 is more than 32". Put two identical PCs next to each other, one running a 32bit linux and the other a 64 bit linux and nobody will be able to tell which is which.

BTW, there are options if you want to run 32bit applications in a 64 bit system:
1. Install multilib (what most other distributions do and one thing I don't personally recommend)
2. Install a 32bit chroot (a lot easier to do than what it seems. We even have some special tools for that. Might be a bit over your skillset yet)
3. Run a 32bit VM (tends to be somewhat slower than native and has restrictions)

Option 2 is the best in my opinion. You literally have a 32 bit system within your 64 bit system, both running natively and the two are completely separate.
slientwind wrote:Could you please give me a good argument why camp a) is better, also in light of online protection against malware?
Online protection against malware? You're once again thinking about Windows. This is a problem with Windows because:
1) everyone downloads random binaries from random places
2) every user has administrative privileges

None of the above is true here.

It's as simple as: if you have a system that is constantly updated, you'll have a system that constantly breaks.
slientwind wrote:And, speaking of Debian, how is Salix different?
This is like asking how an apple is different than an orange. One could answer "they don't have the same color", but you know there's so much more.

In a similar manner, Salix is much simpler and easier to understand than Debian. But there is definitely more than that and I don't have the time to write an essay 1000 pages long. Use both and little by little you'll understand the differences.
slientwind wrote:Would going with Debian provide a potential user the same system stability, security and bug-free use just like Salix?
You're comparing two completely different beasts here, but the answer should be something like: probably, yes.
slientwind wrote:Would it be simply a matter of choice?
Everything is a matter of choice.
slientwind wrote:And if Salix is better, why is that?
Once again, apples and oranges. That 1000 page essay will have to wait.
slientwind wrote:Well, I thought some extra caution wouldn't hurt. I have a desktop, not a server, but I have the habit to scan downloaded pictures, videos, games etc. Plus, I have friends with Windows and we exchange documents from time to time via USB drives etc.

I know that ClamAV doesn't scan in real time, and I'm okay with that. I just though some more safety measures couldn't hurt. :D
Repeat after me: I don't need an antivirus in a linux system.

If you exchange USB drives with your Windows friends, you'll be able to actually see the viruses on the USB drives most of the times (autorun files, exe files that shouldn't be there etc), which they can't. In that case, you can simply delete them and inform them. You don't need an antivirus for that. As others have noted, you only need an antivirus if you're running an email server really.
slientwind wrote:Ok, I haven't used them very often in Windows anyway, but still, how would I clean my Linux system from time to time?
You don't have to, because in order to "clean" it, it would have to get "dirty" first. This doesn't happen. This is not Windows.
slientwind wrote:I don't have much experience with Virtual Box, but using it for such graphically intensive games wouldn't mean playing them on minimum video settings? And even in that case, wouldn't it be quite laggy, because of the emulation? I have the impression that it would be a much worse playing experience than in the real system, but I may be wrong, of course..
I don't know about games really, but I would expect everything to be a bit slower in a VM.
slientwind wrote:Am I right thinking that parent distros are better in general, since they keep things simpler and that means less probability of instability and bugs?
Well, no. Otherwise Salix wouldn't exist. What you're thinking about is Ubuntu and derivatives, which are mostly the same, but with a different wallpaper. Not the same thing.
Image
Image

silentwind
Posts: 24
Joined: 2. Jun 2015, 11:23

Re: Newbie questions and a few guidelines?

Post by silentwind » 3. Jun 2015, 14:08

Hi again, I apologize in advance if my tone in this post may sound rude or conflicting. I just want to understand more about software and Gnu/Linux in general. I don't have IT friends or relatives, and my social life is almost zero (for personal reasons not worth mentioning), so all I can do is research, compare facts and try to draw some conclusions. Please forgive me if I happen to offend anyone.
No. Not unless you have more than 16GB of RAM. You're thinking about Windows. This is not Windows... The only difference is that in 32bit a single app cannot consume more than 4GB of RAM, while in 64bits it can. Unless you're running a web server with php and thousands of (concurrent) visitors or something like trying to compute pi to an almost infinite number of decimals (and doing it all in RAM), you'll never reach that.

There is no such thing as "64 bit apps are faster than 32 bit apps because 64 is more than 32". Put two identical PCs next to each other, one running a 32bit linux and the other a 64 bit linux and nobody will be able to tell which is which.
Please don't take this the wrong way, but others seem to differ:

http://www.digitaltrends.com/computing/ ... g-systems/
http://lifehacker.com/5431284/the-lifeh ... ng-systems
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/64-bit_co ... _vs_64-bit

I'm also consider upgrading the system in the near future, so a 64 bit operating system makes even more sense for me.

How would I know which of the experts is right? But the majority still seems to agree that a 64bit operating system is better suited to a 64bit CPU.

I just want to weigh options and make an informed decision.
Which "64 bit apps" are you talking about exactly? Do you have anything specific in mind?
Graphics heavy 3D Games, multitasking, image/video editing... Does it really matter? What would you prefer: a system that barely meets the actual needs, or one that is prepared for whatever the future may bring?
BTW, there are options if you want to run 32bit applications in a 64 bit system:
1. Install multilib (what most other distributions do and one thing I don't personally recommend)
2. Install a 32bit chroot (a lot easier to do than what it seems. We even have some special tools for that. Might be a bit over your skillset yet)
3. Run a 32bit VM (tends to be somewhat slower than native and has restrictions)

Option 2 is the best in my opinion. You literally have a 32 bit system within your 64 bit system, both running natively and the two are completely separate.
I only need Wine and Playonlinx, do you mean those? I know this sounds lame, but should I go through all that trouble just for that? I could just as well try and aid the Salix devs make the Wine 64 bit version, right? :)
Online protection against malware? You're once again thinking about Windows. This is a problem with Windows because:
1) everyone downloads random binaries from random places
And Linux users never download such things? Yes, downloaded things are fewer, due to the distro taking care of the most common software needs, but still, there are actually cases where people download stuff even in Linux!
It's as simple as: if you have a system that is constantly updated, you'll have a system that constantly breaks
That only says that the updates are done poorly, not that updates in themselves are bad. So all rolling releases are bad by definition? Not that I like rolling releases, I don't, but still, people using them are that much more prone to crashes and instability?
If you exchange USB drives with your Windows friends, you'll be able to actually see the viruses on the USB drives most of the times (autorun files, exe files that shouldn't be there etc), which they can't. In that case, you can simply delete them and inform them. You don't need an antivirus for that
Sorry, I'm not sure. First, aren't some viruses hidden deep inside even a picture? Second, from say thousands of files, how could I quickly check for viruses faster than an antivirus does? Third, isn't it better to be safe than sorry?

Be safe. :)

User avatar
rokytnji
Posts: 76
Joined: 12. Sep 2014, 22:47
Location: Chihuahua Desert

Re: Newbie questions and a few guidelines?

Post by rokytnji » 3. Jun 2015, 14:25

And, speaking of Debian, how is Salix different? Would going with Debian provide a potential user the same system stability, security and bug-free use just like Salix? Would it be simply a matter of choice? And if Salix is better, why is that
Being a team member on a debian based distro and a Salix and Slackel user.

You need to adjust your mind set.
There is no better or worse.

Think in these terms.
You have been living in a all White Anglo community all your life.

You just moved to a all Hispanic community.
They speakt a different language, eat different foods, have different customs, look at life differently in small ways from you.

Neither way is better. Yours or theirs. But both accomplish the same thing.
If you bother to learn Spanish and fit in.
You will become a more enlightened human being with skillz that no one can take from you.

Up to you to decide if the effort is worth it or not to you.
I go and do what ever I want. When I want. With rudimentary skillz. In real life and online.
I know this is not a techy answer.

That is because I am a uneducated scooter tramp who can maneuver using Slackware, Debian, Puppy, Slitaz, Ubuntu (Because I group in my own mind that Mint and Ubuntu. Though based on Debian. Are not Debian when you get into
big personal changes to your system).

Salix and Slackel are more closely related to Slackware than Ubuntu or Mint is related to Debian.
If I can wrap my uneducated brain around that. You should be able to also.

I never knew what a computer was or how to turn one on till 2008. So.
There is your
essay 1000 pages long
condensed by a linux using scooter tramp.
8-)

Techy part: Slackware is rock solid and has a long rep for that. That rep goes back years.
Debian stable is rock solid, but you do not get latest or greatest. Testing repos, better know your stuff. Sid repos. Better know your stuff and have a online friend that knows more than you. I won't into Debian Experimental repos.
You have to be one of the filthy few to roll with Debian experimental. I run one netbook that way
cuz I can.

Being cautious has it's merits I guess. Me. I be not afeared. In real life or with computers and operating systems.
Just grin and have fun while you gain skillz you never realized you had.
:ugeek:

User avatar
gapan
Salix Wizard
Posts: 5509
Joined: 6. Jun 2009, 17:40

Re: Newbie questions and a few guidelines?

Post by gapan » 3. Jun 2015, 15:38

Once again, all of that is about Windows. Get over it.

The 32bit kernel in Slackware (and hence in Salix) is compiled with PAE support. Look here for more info:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Physical_Address_Extension

(I thought that up to 16GB can be used in 32bits, but it says 64GB in that page. I guess I was wrong)
slientwind wrote:I'm also consider upgrading the system in the near future, so a 64 bit operating system makes even more sense for me.

How would I know which of the experts is right? But the majority still seems to agree that a 64bit operating system is better suited to a 64bit CPU.
I'm not telling you to not install 64bit. I'm telling you that if you want to run 32bit applications, it only makes sense to install a 32bit system.
slientwind wrote:Graphics heavy 3D Games
As far as I know most games are 32bit binaries anyway, so it doesn't matter if the kernel they run under is 64bits.
slientwind wrote:multitasking
This has nothing to do with 32bits or 64bits. It has been a reality since decades now. Even 16bit systems could multitask with no problem at all and there are even multitasking OSes for popular 8bit systems of the '80s.
slientwind wrote:image/video editing...
This could potentially benefit from a 64bit system, depending on what you do exactly. If you find an application that would consume more than 4GB of RAM doing what you do, then as I wrote before, a 64bit system would just use it. A 32bit system would restrict it to 4GB per application.
slientwind wrote:Does it really matter? What would you prefer: a system that barely meets the actual needs, or one that is prepared for whatever the future may bring?
Yes, it does matter. You need to determine your needs first. If you say that you do video editing and want to be able to have an application use more than 4GB of RAM, then going with 64bits is the only way. If you say you want to use 32bit applications (and games), then you definitely have to use a 32bit system, or at least 32bit libraries in some way.
slientwind wrote:I only need Wine and Playonlinx, do you mean those? I know this sounds lame, but should I go through all that trouble just for that?
Yes, you should.
slientwind wrote:I could just as well try and aid the Salix devs make the Wine 64 bit version, right? :)
No, because there is no 64bit version of Wine. Actually, there is, but it can only run 64bit Windows applications and so it's mostly useless as most of the windows applications are 32bit. Everybody is using 32bit Wine.
slientwind wrote:And Linux users never download such things? Yes, downloaded things are fewer, due to the distro taking care of the most common software needs, but still, there are actually cases where people download stuff even in Linux!
No, they don't. It's only Windows users that carry the Windows mentality and are only starting with Linux that do that.
slientwind wrote:That only says that the updates are done poorly, not that updates in themselves are bad. So all rolling releases are bad by definition? Not that I like rolling releases, I don't, but still, people using them are that much more prone to crashes and instability?
In my opinion, yes, all rolling releases are bad by definition, if stability is your primary concern. If you only want the latest and greatest and don't care if it breaks your system every now and then, then they are perfect.
slientwind wrote:Sorry, I'm not sure. First, aren't some viruses hidden deep inside even a picture?
Yes, that's why I wrote "most times".
slientwind wrote:Second, from say thousands of files, how could I quickly check for viruses faster than an antivirus does? Third, isn't it better to be safe than sorry?
The point is that you are safe anyway. Windows viruses cannot possibly harm a Linux system. It's as simple as that. BTW, here's what I get for clamav:

Code: Select all

$ spi clamav
Available packages:
None

Available SlackBuilds:
clamav [Not installed]: clamav (a GPL-ed virus scanner)
clamav-unofficial-sigs [Not installed]: clamav-unofficial-sigs (unofficial clamav signatures)
clamsmtp [Not installed]: clamsmtp (ClamAV SMTP filter)
clamtk [Not installed]: clamtk (A frontend for ClamAV)
Install it if it makes you happy.
Image
Image

Post Reply