Newbie questions and a few guidelines?

Other talk about Salix
User avatar
icaroperseo
Donor
Posts: 67
Joined: 19. Nov 2014, 01:12
Contact:

Re: Newbie questions and a few guidelines?

Post by icaroperseo » 3. Jun 2015, 17:12

slientwind wrote: How would I know which of the experts is right? But the majority still seems to agree that a 64bit operating system is better suited to a 64bit CPU.
I think at this point it is emerging a misunderstanding. I think what you're really saying is that a 64-bit system has advantages over a 32-bit, and you are absolutely right, but this does not solve your dilemma. Currently there are still many applications (if not the majority) that are being developed and maintained almost exclusively for 32-bit architectures, a clear example are Skype and Steam (until recently, both Windows and Ubuntu strongly recommend using the 32-bit versions of the operating system to conserve such compatibility). Because of this Wine and PlayOnLinux only have full support for this architecture. As you will understand, the shift to native 64-bit applications will be a very slow and gradual process (process that very likely will take many years) and will depend almost entirely on the good faith of its own developers. Currently only it makes sense to use a 64-bit if you have the assurance that not need 32-bit applications, otherwise, it is preferable to use a 32-bit system (for convenience). Since as mentioned previously, there is no real advantage to use a pure 64-bit system. In your particular case, I see that you could find it much more troublesome use this type of system that one of 32 bits, is what I can do for you :).
slientwind wrote: Graphics heavy 3D Games, multitasking, image/video editing... Does it really matter? What would you prefer: a system that barely meets the actual needs, or one that is prepared for whatever the future may bring?
Have you seen that does matter? ;)
slientwind wrote: I only need Wine and Playonlinx, do you mean those? I know this sounds lame, but should I go through all that trouble just for that?
Again, I think it makes more sense to use a 32-bit OS.
slientwind wrote: I could just as well try and aid the Salix devs make the Wine 64 bit version, right? :)
PlayOnLinux is just an "application" (is really a chunk of scripts) that helps simplify the process of configuring Wine when installing Windows applications on GNU/Linux. Wine is the key word, not misunderstand me but from what I've read the future of this does not sound very promising.
slientwind wrote: And Linux users never download such things? Yes, downloaded things are fewer, due to the distro taking care of the most common software needs, but still, there are actually cases where people download stuff even in Linux!
Believe it or not, a user of GNU/Linux becomes more cautious for this kind of thing and as a rule, almost never resorted to this procedure. If the application is not in the repositories of the your distribution, then turns directly to your compilation. Absurd as it may be heard, this helps mitigate many headaches :lol: This you will check over time. :)
slientwind wrote: That only says that the updates are done poorly, not that updates in themselves are bad. So all rolling releases are bad by definition? Not that I like rolling releases, I don't, but still, people using them are that much more prone to crashes and instability?
Usually rolling release distributions are for people who have the time, desire, skills and experience to correct the flaws that very likely be presented. Slackware and Debian They are considered the most stable GNU/Linux distributions that there, both they share the slogan: "If something works well, do not touch it!", this is the key to its stability.
slientwind wrote: Sorry, I'm not sure. First, aren't some viruses hidden deep inside even a picture? Second, from say thousands of files, how could I quickly check for viruses faster than an antivirus does? Third, isn't it better to be safe than sorry?
Malware writers generally focus on operating systems with greater market share (Windows and Android) and who want to reach as many users as possible. This sounds logical since currently developing malware is not something trivial. Moreover, GNU/Linux is designed to hinder the functions malicious applications could perform. Because of these aspects, GNU/Linux is not a priority target for malicious developers. GNU/Linux is not a priority for them to not be feasible. What I'm trying to say is that you should not worry too much about these aspects. If you upgrade your system whenever there is an update available and if you hear your judgment I assure you it will be very difficult to face a problem of this type.

Just a disclaimer: When I refire to bad Windows-like practices, what I wanted to convey is to do all that sort of thing is right or normal, but in GNU/Linux does not. Windows users need to do that for them as it is a poorly designed system, otherwise the Unix-like operating systems (like GNU/Linux). Please do not feel slighted, especially by what you are happening it is part of the natural process experienced by newcomers (it is a kind of reeducation). I know sometimes our answers may seem arrogant, but believe me, we just try to orient you in the best possible way for this transition period not be too frustrating (this does not mean that there is disconcerting). Unlike other forums of distributions for "newbies", most of the people who are here have many years of experience and it could hardly bad advice so do not hesitate too much about what they suggest to you. ;)

Be sure to ask, that's the key!

Best regards.
Image

Image

User avatar
ChuangTzu
Donor
Posts: 342
Joined: 19. May 2015, 23:34

Re: Newbie questions and a few guidelines?

Post by ChuangTzu » 3. Jun 2015, 19:06

Excuse me for a second while I ROFLMAO about Roky comparing Debian to an All Anglo Neighborhood...LOL

Seriously though.... Debian has its strengths for some and for others those same strengths are its weaknesses. I was a long long time user of Debian, as well as many other distros...The main problem with Debian is they patch and modify programs (IMO) way too much. Basically taking the programmers work and making it "theirs", Debian Kernel, Debian version of this, Debian version of that etc... Then when bad things happen they blame it on the developers...well sorry, but you just can't do that after you modified the crap out of it...

Try telling Ford that it is their fault that your non factory modified muffler fell off when you ran over a pot hole...LOL
Debian is also going through a major brew haha and the management is in shambles over systemd being forced on them, yeah yeah, they voted for it...and that is why alot of the developers are trying to fork a non systemd Debian (Devuan).... But I digress.

Slackware, sticking to a much simpler philosophy (and so does Salix) does not suffer from as many problems of other distros....Trusted Developers ship a program, kernel etc... and Slackware uses it or makes it available.... If holes are found then Slackware patches the core programs as updates...or they come from the developers etc... Debian creates many many holes with their custom patches....

Regarding Arch...They do not have a security protocol, believing that the latest programs will correct the prior holes....may be true, but you are also the guinea pig for the new holes as you will get them first....

You mentioned Fedora, to each his own...just remember that Fedora is controlled by RedHat and you may want to look into who owns/controls them and see if you are comfortable with that...Some are, some are not.

Since you are new to GNU/Linux, there are a few main branches with many offshoots....everything basically derives from the following in one way or another:
RedHat
Debian
Slackware
https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/ ... meline.svg

then there is:
BSD (FreeBSD, NetBSD, OpenBSD, dragonflyBSD, PCBSD etc...)

Personally, I like being as close to the main parent as possible or a child that did not fall far from the tree....Salix is more closely related to Slackware than Ubuntu is to Debian....

Just my thoughts...Great having new people bringing questions...brings life to projects don't you think? :)

User avatar
icaroperseo
Donor
Posts: 67
Joined: 19. Nov 2014, 01:12
Contact:

Re: Newbie questions and a few guidelines?

Post by icaroperseo » 3. Jun 2015, 19:29

ChuangTzu wrote:Great having new people bringing questions...brings life to projects don't you think? :)
Sure, It is really fun and inspiring! (not to mention it makes me remember those old days when he was also a newcomer) :lol: .
Image

Image

silentwind
Posts: 24
Joined: 2. Jun 2015, 11:23

Re: Newbie questions and a few guidelines?

Post by silentwind » 4. Jun 2015, 13:01

Well, it seems I have to think about a lot of things before I make a choice...

As for the security aspect of Linux, I still consider it's better to be a little more paranoid than lose your important documents. Others agree:

http://arstechnica.com/security/2015/04 ... d-servers/
https://blogs.sophos.com/2015/03/26/don ... -security/

It wouldn't hurt if more distros made quick newbie guides about how to best protect themselves against various threats.

In any case, thanks for your support. Take care.

User avatar
ChuangTzu
Donor
Posts: 342
Joined: 19. May 2015, 23:34

Re: Newbie questions and a few guidelines?

Post by ChuangTzu » 4. Jun 2015, 20:49

Breaking the windows mindset/control is very hard for some people...Perhaps, you should keep windows and install a GNU/Linux distro on another partition (dual boot) or run GNU/Linux in virtualbox until you become more familiar with it...

This is why I do not agree with people trying to recruit windows users to Linux or BSD, let it be for those who want it and are willing to learn it.

Post Reply